Sandpoint Area History
 
 
The earliest known people to inhabit Sandpoint, the Kalispel Indians, were a semi-nomadic tribe that originally numbered around three thousand people. The word Kalispel means 'River/Lake Paddlers" or "Camas People."
The Kalispels' largest permanent camp, Qapquape, or Sandy Place, was located where the Pend Oreille River drains west from Lake Pend Orielle—now known as Sandpoint.
Lake Pend Oreille, named for the shell earrings the Natives wore, was at that time called "Lake Kalispel," which only covered 84,240 acres at its highest level. Today it covers 97,490 acres and 148 sq. miles. 
The Kalispels spoke Salish, a language spoken also by their comrades to the south, the Spokane, Couer d' alene, and Flathead tribes. 
During the summer months, the Kalispels moved around in teepees, hunting game both large and small, fishing, picking berries and digging roots. Camas, an onion-like root, made up such a large portion of their diet that they became known by that name. In winter months they lived in long lodges, dug three feet into the ground and covered with woven mats and skins.
People of medium height, sturdy structure, and dark brown skin, the Camas People had straight black hair—usually worn in two braids—black eyes, and broad faces with high cheekbones. They were known to neighboring tribes as both brave in battle and honest.
The first white person recorded in Sandpoint was a man by the name of David Thompson. By 1880 a permanent white settlement had developed along the banks of Sand Creek. The Kalispels treated them as friends and enjoyed the white men's inventions immeasurably. They soon added to their flint and bone tools such weapons as guns and steel to make tools. They would trade beaver furs for pots and pans, tobacco, beads, and cloth. 
Another thing the whites brought was the Northern Pacific railroad. The sand from the shores of Sandpoint was used for the operation of the steam engines.
In 1887, the United States Government decided that the Kalispel should move to the Jocko Flathead reservation. Some went, but others refused, saying they wanted land of their own. Eventually they got their way and moved to Usk, Washington, where some of their descendants still live.

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Sandpoint History

 
 

The earliest known people to inhabit Sandpoint, the Kalispel Indians, were a semi-nomadic tribe that originally numbered around three thousand people. The word Kalispel means 'River/Lake Paddlers" or "Camas People."

The Kalispels' largest permanent camp, Qapquape, or Sandy Place, was located where the Pend Oreille River drains west from Lake Pend Orielle—now known as Sandpoint.

Lake Pend Oreille, named for the shell earrings the Natives wore, was at that time called "Lake Kalispel," which only covered 84,240 acres at its highest level. Today it covers 97,490 acres and 148 sq. miles. 

The Kalispels spoke Salish, a language spoken also by their comrades to the south, the Spokane, Couer d' alene, and Flathead tribes. 

During the summer months, the Kalispels moved around in teepees, hunting game both large and small, fishing, picking berries and digging roots. Camas, an onion-like root, made up such a large portion of their diet that they became known by that name. In winter months they lived in long lodges, dug three feet into the ground and covered with woven mats and skins.

People of medium height, sturdy structure, and dark brown skin, the Camas People had straight black hair—usually worn in two braids—black eyes, and broad faces with high cheekbones. They were known to neighboring tribes as both brave in battle and honest.

The first white person recorded in Sandpoint was a man by the name of David Thompson. By 1880 a permanent white settlement had developed along the banks of Sand Creek. The Kalispels treated them as friends and enjoyed the white men's inventions immeasurably. They soon added to their flint and bone tools such weapons as guns and steel to make tools. They would trade beaver furs for pots and pans, tobacco, beads, and cloth. 

Another thing the whites brought was the Northern Pacific railroad. The sand from the shores of Sandpoint was used for the operation of the steam engines.

In 1887, the United States Government decided that the Kalispel should move to the Jocko Flathead reservation. Some went, but others refused, saying they wanted land of their own. Eventually they got their way and moved to Usk, Washington, where some of their descendants still live.

 

 
 

The earliest known people to inhabit Sandpoint, the Kalispel Indians, were a semi-nomadic tribe that originally numbered around three thousand people. The word Kalispel means 'River/Lake Paddlers" or "Camas People."

The Kalispels' largest permanent camp, Qapquape, or Sandy Place, was located where the Pend Oreille River drains west from Lake Pend Orielle—now known as Sandpoint.

Lake Pend Oreille, named for the shell earrings the Natives wore, was at that time called "Lake Kalispel," which only covered 84,240 acres at its highest level. Today it covers 97,490 acres and 148 sq. miles. 

The Kalispels spoke Salish, a language spoken also by their comrades to the south, the Spokane, Couer d' alene, and Flathead tribes. 

During the summer months, the Kalispels moved around in teepees, hunting game both large and small, fishing, picking berries and digging roots. Camas, an onion-like root, made up such a large portion of their diet that they became known by that name. In winter months they lived in long lodges, dug three feet into the ground and covered with woven mats and skins.

People of medium height, sturdy structure, and dark brown skin, the Camas People had straight black hair—usually worn in two braids—black eyes, and broad faces with high cheekbones. They were known to neighboring tribes as both brave in battle and honest.

The first white person recorded in Sandpoint was a man by the name of David Thompson. By 1880 a permanent white settlement had developed along the banks of Sand Creek. The Kalispels treated them as friends and enjoyed the white men's inventions immeasurably. They soon added to their flint and bone tools such weapons as guns and steel to make tools. They would trade beaver furs for pots and pans, tobacco, beads, and cloth. 

Another thing the whites brought was the Northern Pacific railroad. The sand from the shores of Sandpoint was used for the operation of the steam engines.

In 1887, the United States Government decided that the Kalispel should move to the Jocko Flathead reservation. Some went, but others refused, saying they wanted land of their own. Eventually they got their way and moved to Usk, Washington, where some of their descendants still live.